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Other FAQs


 

Push Email on Mobile Devices:-
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)


Q1

What's the typical cost of having Push Email?


Q2

Can I use Push Email when I go overseas?


Q3

How can I stop my Smartphone alerting me to unimportant emails?


Q4

What can I do to safeguard the information on my Smartphone if it's been lost or stolen?


Q5

How can I get Push Email working on my Smartphone which isn't a
Windows Mobile 5 or 6 device?


Q6

I've enabled new message notification on my Smartphone but it only works sometimes. What's wrong?


Q7

How do I delete an Exchange server ActiveSync connection on my Smartphone?


Q8

With Push Email working, do I still need to use ActiveSync to synchronise with my PC?


Q9

I've followed your instructions but I just can't get Push Email to work. Any suggestions?


Q10

My Inbox is kept synchronised on my Smartphone but my Sent Items folder is empty.
How can I keep my Sent Items folder synchronised as well?



   

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Q1

What's the typical cost of having Push Email?

 

A1

There are 3 elements to the cost of having Push Email:-

1 -

The Cost of the Smartphone
The real cost of these devices is £125 to £550 but, if you buy it from a mobile operator and take out a contract at the same time, which commits you to on-going monthly payments for up to 24 months, the mobile operator is likely to subsidise up to 100% of the purchase cost of the phone, on the assumption that your monthly payments will more than compensate for this subsidy.
In any case, purchasing a Smartphone is a one off payment and so it may be a false economy to choose the cheapest phone, as the other costs involved with Direct Push are the same whether you have a deluxe or bargain Smartphone.
Finding a Smartphone that you're going to be happy with is the most difficult part of this process.


2 -

An Exchange Mailbox to provide Push Email Functionality
If your company has its own Exchange server then this is easy - just make sure mobile access is enabled on your account.
Otherwise companies and individuals can rent a Push Email-enabled Hosted Exchange mailbox.
At Arrowmail we charge £5.99/month for our standard mailbox which will suit most people.
If we're not the cheapest then we won't be far off, so the cost of an Exchange mailbox isn't an area where you're going to find ways of reducing the overall cost of Direct Push email.


3 -

Mobile Data Charges
Data charges have come down in price a lot in the last few years, but you still have to be careful when travelling overseas.
For Push Email to work, the connection between your Smartphone and the Exchange server must be active all the time to allow Exchange to initiate a "push" to your device, without delay, when required.
GPRS and 3G mobile connections only charge for data sent and received and not the amount of time you're connected, thank goodness!
Also Push Email is designed to use the minimum amount of data when nothing's happening.
Even so, you should expect Direct Push to consume around 50mb of data transfer per month.
You can now get 100mb of data as an add-on to your normal monthly mobile phone bill for £5/month.
So while the cost of Push Email in the UK is reasonable and predictable it's the opposite when roaming overseas. £10/day is probably the least it will cost you and that's in more advanced countries. Choosing a hotel with Internet, using WiFi access points and buying a local SIM card are some on the things you can do to stay connected to your email when travelling abroad - see the next question.

 

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Q2

Can I use Push Email when I go overseas?

 

A2

Yes, in most countries, but at a price.
When we go overseas on business trips or holidays we accept that our next monthly mobile bill will be, perhaps 50% higher than normal and try to reduce the number and length of calls we make and receive, and even use alternatives like Skype.
Mobile Networks offer voice and text deals for going overseas to encourage mobile phone use while keeping costs down.
While the GPRS and 3G connections, required for Push Email, will work automatically in most countries, the cost you'll be paying per megabyte of data transferred is a minimum of £2, typically £5 and if your Smartphone locks onto a non-preferred network, £10 or more. EU regulations now mean that, unless you opt out of this beforehand, your phone will be disconnected once your bill has gone over €50
Last time I checked, only Vodafone was offering a data package that included use overseas and that was £15/month and then a minimum of £10/day while overseas.

Should you use Push Email while overseas?
The other costs involved with business trips - air-fares, taxis, hotels and eating out - make £20/day for mobile data look like a trivial amount.
If the benefits of Push Email are likely to assist you in the success of your business trip then of course you must use it.
However, for holidays and business trips where Push Email is not essential, the sense of being ripped off will probably make you reluctant to use it. In this case you should make sure your hotel has Internet available, find WiFi access points to use or even buy a local SIM card with a data allowance if your smartphone is not locked to one network.

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Q3

How can I stop my Smartphone alerting me to unimportant emails?

 

A3

Use an email system with a good spam filter and then setup Rules from within Outlook, on your PC, to automatically divert emails you don't want to read on your Smartphone, to other folders in your mailbox where you can read them later from a Desktop PC.
There's more information about using Rules here.

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Q4

What can I do to safeguard the information on my Smartphone if it's been lost or stolen?

 

A4

Let us know your Smartphone has been lost and we'll queue your device for a Remote Wipe.
When Exchange initiates a Remote Wipe of a mobile device it erases all user data, extra programs and configuration information to set it back to it's factory state.
Microsoft chose not to make the Remote Wipe process erase the contents of any memory card inserted in the Smartphone, however, with Windows Mobile 6 you can choose to encrypt the contents of the memory card.
The Smartphone obviously has to be turned on, connected to the Internet and attempting to synchronise with the Exchange server for it to receive it's self-destruct order.

Here's what appears on the Smartphone's screen when it receives such an order:-


 
A Smartphone receiving a Remote Wipe instruction and asking for permission to go ahead  


The question in this pop-up rates as the most disingenuous of all the questions asked in Microsoft products.
It really means "is it OK to wipe everything on your device?"
Of course, the question is being asked of the person who's stolen your Smartphone and the idea is to encourage this person to select "OK" so that your personal information on the Smartphone can be erased.
Maybe the question shouldn't be asked and the wipe just go ahead anyway.

Back at the mother-ship, the news of a successful Remote Wipe is greeted with cheers all round:-


 
Exchange Mobile Admin reporting a successful Remote Wipe
   
 

If a lost Smartphone is found, the Remote Wipe order has to be cancelled on the Exchange server otherwise, when a device that has already been wiped once, attempts to re-connect to Exchange (a process which requires a valid username and password to be supplied) a second Remote Wipe will be initiated.

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Q5

How can I get Push Email working on my Smartphone which isn't a Windows Mobile 5 or 6 device?

 

A5

Many non-Windows Smartphones come with their own ActiveSync client to allow them to operate with an Exchange server. This include the iPhone, Android phones and Nokia phones with the Mail For Exchange app. installed.
If your built-in software won't work, there's a 3rd party Direct Push client called RoadSync from DataViz which costs US$99. They make a version for almost every type of Smartphone including earlier version of Windows Mobile.
Another program that DataViz sell, that's worth mentioning here, is
Documents To Go which allows you to work with Microsoft Word and Excel documents.

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Q6

I've enabled new message notification on my Smartphone but it only works sometimes. What's wrong?

 

A6

You may be leaving your Mobile Outlook open and displayed on your Windows Smartphone. This disables alerts for new email on the assumption that you must be looking at the screen and so will see when a new email arrives.
It's very easy just to leave your Inbox displayed, the phone go into power-saving and you put it into your pocket.
If this happens, although new emails are still being pushed to your Windows Smartphone, you won't be alerted to their arrival.

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Q7

How do I delete an Exchange server ActiveSync connection on my Smartphone?

 

A7

It may be staring you in the face but sometimes you just can't see how to do it!
On your Smartphone, open ActiveSync and go to Menu - Options and on the next screen that appears select Delete:-


 
How to delete an ActiveSync relationship with an Exchange server

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Q8

With Push Email working, do I still need to use ActiveSync to synchronise with my PC?

 

A8

ActiveSync is a Microsoft program that's been evolving over numerous years and was up to version 4.5 the last time I looked.
It started as a way to transfer items between a PC and a PDA, mostly to keep your contacts in sync.
Later, you were able use it to synchronise all Outlook data between your PC's copy of Outlook and the one on your PDA.
The next step was to allow the PDA to synchronise "over the air" directly with an Exchange server.
When this was working reliably, there was no longer any need to synchronise your PDA's email data with a PC, as both PC and PDA would now be synchronising directly with the server
Initially this PDA/Exchange synchronization was user-initiated and it took a false start by Microsoft of using SMS text messages to alert a Smartphone of new email, before the current Push Email system came into being.

The answer to this question, therefore, is that you don't need to setup an ActiveSync relationship between your Smartphone and PC for anything to do with email but there are still several good reasons to set one up:-


To install a new program on your Smartphone usually requires running an installation program on a PC which then initiates the installation, through the ActiveSync connection, on the Smartphone itself.

The ActiveSync connection is a useful way to transfers files back-and-forth between a PC and Smartphone.
Such a file might be your Active Directory Root digital certificate which the Smartphone needs to enable Direct Push from your Exchange server.

A Smartphone can usually get Internet access through the ActiveSync connection and then via the PC's connection which, if you're sat at your desk for a long period, can save on mobile data costs.
Doing this occasionally will synchronise your Smartphone's clock with a reference time source and you can synchronise other things such as Internet Explorer's Favourites.

Your can backup your Smartphone's data and configuration settings to your PC.

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Q9

I've followed your instructions but I just can't get Push Email to work. Any suggestions?

 

A9

Make sure your Smartphone is connected to the Internet by opening a webpage in Internet Explorer. This is a good page to use as a test:-
http://www.bbc.co.uk/mobile
Although a Smartphone is supposed to get an Internet connection through the ActiveSync connection with a PC, it doesn't always work and it's really only important that it can access the Internet using 3G/GPRS and perhaps WiFi.

Make sure that you can connect to our server and you're using the correct username and password.
See if you can access your email using OMA by opening the browser on your Smartphone and going to:-
https://exchange.arrowmail.co.uk/oma

Try setting up Microsoft's PDA Emulator on your PC which is a free program that simulates a Smartphone on your PC's screen.
This virtual PDA is fully functional except that you can't make phone calls however ActiveSync and Direct Push work just like a real one.
If Direct Push works on the virtual Smartphone then the problem's likely to be with your real Smartphone and you can compare settings between the two.

Arrowmail's servers use a commercial digital certificate from Thawte which Smartphones are set to trust by default.
If you are trying to get Direct Push to work with another server you may need to import the root certificate which that server is using, into your Smartphone's Trusted Root Certificate store.

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Q10

My Inbox is kept synchronised on my Smartphone but my Sent Items folder is empty.
How can I keep my Sent Items folder synchronised as well?

 

A10

By default, these are the only folders that are synchronised on your Windows Smartphone:-
Inbox,
Calendar
Contacts
Tasks

You can add as many of your other email folders as you like so long as your Windows Smartphone has enough memory to store them all.
Usually Smartphones can only hold a subset of your complete mailbox which would be all your more recent items.
Instructions for adding extra folders are here.

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